Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Revista Española de Enfermedades Digestivas]]> http://scielo.isciii.es/rss.php?pid=1130-010820060008&lang=es vol. 98 num. 8 lang. es <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://scielo.isciii.es/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://scielo.isciii.es <![CDATA[<B>Utilidad de la ecografía anal en la fístula anal</B>]]> http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1130-01082006000800001&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es <![CDATA[<B>¿Es útil la ecografía endoanal en el estudio de la fístula anal compleja recidivada?</B>]]> http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1130-01082006000800002&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Introduction: performing anal endosonography in complex fistula-in-ano allows us to design a personalized surgical strategy in each case, thereby improving results. However, there are doubts in the literature as to its utility in recurrent complex fistulas. The aim of this study was to compare the utility of anal ultrasonography in the study of primary versus recurrent complex fistula-in-ano. Patients and method: prospective study of patients diagnosed and treated for complex fistula-in-ano. Physical examination and anal ultrasonography provided data on primary track, internal opening, horseshoe extension and the presence of secondary tracks or cavities in a protocol designed specifically for the study. These assessments were subsequently contrasted with operative findings. Results: we included 35 patients, 19 (54.3%) with primary complex anal fistulas and 16 (45.7%) with recurrent fistulas. According to the operative findings, fistulas were classified as high transsphincteric in 28 patients (80%), suprasphincteric in 6 (17.1%) and extrasphincteric in one patient (2.9%), with no differences between groups. Physical examination correctly classified 28 of the 35 fistulous tracks, in contrast to the 32 (91.4%) correctly described on ultrasonography (80%). We did not find any statistically significant differences between the primary and the recurrent fistula groups with regard to sensibility, positive predictive value and accuracy of the anal ultrasonography for any of the parameters studied. Conclusion: the accuracy of anal ultrasonography does not decrease in recurrent complex fistula-in-ano. <![CDATA[<B>Resonancia magnética y ecoendoscopia para el estadiaje del cáncer gástrico</B>]]> http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1130-01082006000800003&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Objective: to determine the diagnostic precision of endoscopic ultrasounds (EUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative staging of gastric cancer. Methods: a prospective, blind study was carried out in 17 patients diagnosed with gastric cancer (GC) using endoscopic biopsy from November 2002 to June 2003. Patients underwent preoperative MRI and EUS. The reference test used was pathology, and laparotomy for non-resectable cases. Results: MRI (53%) was better than EUS in the assessment of gastric wall infiltration (35%). MRI (50%) was also superior to EUS (42%) for N staging. After pooling stages T1-T2 and T3-T4 together, results improved for both MRI (67 and 87.5%, respectively) and EUS (67 and 62.5%, respectively) (p < 0.05). N staging -lymph node invasion- results were correct in 50% for MRI as compared to EUS (42%). In classifying positive and negative lymph nodes EUS was superior to MRI (73 versus 54%). Conclusions: MRI was the best method in the assessment of gastric wall infiltration. EUS was superior to MRI for T1 staging, and in the assessment of lymph node infiltration. <![CDATA[<B>Mucosectomía guiada por USE en el cáncer digestivo</B>]]> http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1130-01082006000800004&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Introduction: the only way of improving prognosis and survival in gastrointestinal cancer is early diagnosis, with intramucosal localization as confirmed by endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) or 20-MHz miniprobes (MPs) (T1) being most appropriate. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) has proven effective in the treatment of this sort of lesions. Patients and method: in a group (18 cases) with 15 cases of superficial gastrointestinal cancer and 3 cases of severe gastric dysplasia, 9 cases (3 esophageal, 4 gastric, 2 rectal) underwent a classic EMR following EUS or a 7.5- and 20-MHz miniprobe exploration. Results: ultrasonographic studies showed a T1 in all but one esophageal case (Tis), and in both gastric dysplasias, with no changed layer structure being demonstrated in the latter (T0). No complications arose with classic EMR, and all 9 patients are alive and free from local or metastatic recurrence, except for one esophageal case, which recurred distally to the esophageal lesion (metachronous). Conclusions: echoendoscopically-assisted EMR is a safe, effective technique in the endoscopic management of superficial gastrointestinal (esophageal, gastric, colorectal) cancer. Recurrence most likely depends upon cancer multiplicity. <![CDATA[<B>Indicaciones y opciones terapéuticas en la hepatolitiasis</B>]]> http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1130-01082006000800005&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Objective: to present our experience with the treatment of hepatolithiasis. Patients and methods: experimental design: a retrospective study. Every patient operated on during 2002-2004. Results: mean age was 68.2 years. All patients were male. Two patients had been operated on before. The other three suffered from: monolobar Caroli's disease (1), cholangiocarcinoma (1), and hepatolihtiasis without clear etiologic factors (1). All of them had intrahepatic and extrahepatic litihiasis. Clinical signs included: pain in RUQ, fever, and jaundice. Bilirubin was 3.5 mg/dl (min: 1.7, max: 5.9), GGT: 676.2 IU/l (min: 29, max: 2039), and alkaline phosphatase: 400 IU/l (min: 100, max: 1136). Abdominal ultrasounds always correctly diagnosed HL. CT (3 patients) only diagnosed one case. ERCP (3 patients) and cholangio-MRI (2 patients) always diagnosed HL correctly. Surgical procedures were: hepatojejunostomy with lavage of bile duct (2 cases) and hepatectomy (3 cases) -both right (1) and left (2). We always performed an intraoperative ultrasonography and choledoscopy. Morbidity was: biliary fistula (1 case) treated by percutaneous drainage. No mortality occurred. Median stay was 8.8 days. Mean follow-up is 12 months (min: 11, max: 20). No relapse has been observed. Conclusions: HL is infrequent in Spain. Surgical treatment, usually liver resection, obtains good results with low morbidity and mortality. <![CDATA[<B>Hepatitis C y resistencia a la insulina</B>: <B>esteatosis, fibrosis y no respuesta</B>]]> http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1130-01082006000800006&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Insulin resistance is more often seen in hepatitis C than in other liver diseases, including non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The Homeostasis Model for Assessment [HOMA= fasting insulin (mUI/ml) * fasting glucose (mmol/L) / 22.5] has proved useful in the measurement of insulin sensitivity in euglycemic patients. Cross-sectional and case-cohort studies support a role for hepatitis C as a factor implied in the development of type-2 diabetes in high-risk patients (male patients, older than 40 years, and overweight). In transgenic mice models the HCV core protein has been found to induce insulin resistance via TNF production. Insulin resistance has been associated with steatosis development and fibrosis progression in a genotype-dependent manner. In genotype-1 patients, the mechanisms by which insulin resistance promotes fibrosis progression include: a) steatosis; b) hyperleptinemia; c) increased TNF production; and d) impaired expression of PPARγ receptors. Indeed, insulin resistance has been found as a common denominator to the majority of features associated with difficult-to-treat patients. Patients with cirrhosis, obesity, coinfected with HIV, and Afro-American, all of them showed insulin resistance. Insulin resistance strongly influences sustained response rates, at least in genotype-1 patients. Insulin resistance decreases during and after treatment in patients that achieved virus C clearance. Moreover, the incidence of type-2 diabetes seems to be lower in responders than in non-responders. In summary, hepatitis C promotes insulin resistance and insulin resistance induces steatosis, fibrosis, and interferon resistance. The treatment of insulin resistance by decreasing hyperinsulinemia could improve sustained response rates in patients with chronic hepatitis C treated with peginterferon plus ribavirin. <![CDATA[<B>Pseudoquiste pancreático de localización hepática</B>]]> http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1130-01082006000800007&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Pancreatic pseudocyst is a common complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Extrapancreatic locations of pancreatic pseudocyst in the liver, pleura, mediastinum, or pelvis have been described. However, a pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver is an infrequent condition. We present the case of a 46-year-old man with pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. During admission, the patient underwent an abdominal CT scan that showed a mass located in the head and body of the pancreas, as well as a thrombosis of the splenic vein. A percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas was obtained under CT guidance, which showed no tumoral involvement. Fourty-eight hours after the procedure the patient developed abdominal pain and elevated serum amylase levels. A pancreatic MRI exam showed two pancreatic pseudocysts, one of them located in the left hepatic lobe, the other in the pancreatic tail. Chronic pancreatitis signs also were found. Enteral nutrition via a nasojejunal tube was administered for two weeks. The disappearance of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the pancreatic tail, and a subtotal resolution of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver were observed. To date twenty-seven cases of pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver have been published, most of them managed with percutaneous or surgical drainage. <![CDATA[<B>Colitis por <I>Cryptosporidium</I> como forma de presentación en un paciente con síndrome de inmunodeficiencia adquirida</B>]]> http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1130-01082006000800008&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Pancreatic pseudocyst is a common complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Extrapancreatic locations of pancreatic pseudocyst in the liver, pleura, mediastinum, or pelvis have been described. However, a pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver is an infrequent condition. We present the case of a 46-year-old man with pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. During admission, the patient underwent an abdominal CT scan that showed a mass located in the head and body of the pancreas, as well as a thrombosis of the splenic vein. A percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas was obtained under CT guidance, which showed no tumoral involvement. Fourty-eight hours after the procedure the patient developed abdominal pain and elevated serum amylase levels. A pancreatic MRI exam showed two pancreatic pseudocysts, one of them located in the left hepatic lobe, the other in the pancreatic tail. Chronic pancreatitis signs also were found. Enteral nutrition via a nasojejunal tube was administered for two weeks. The disappearance of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the pancreatic tail, and a subtotal resolution of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver were observed. To date twenty-seven cases of pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver have been published, most of them managed with percutaneous or surgical drainage. <![CDATA[<B>Hepatitis autoinmune</B>]]> http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1130-01082006000800009&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Pancreatic pseudocyst is a common complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Extrapancreatic locations of pancreatic pseudocyst in the liver, pleura, mediastinum, or pelvis have been described. However, a pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver is an infrequent condition. We present the case of a 46-year-old man with pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. During admission, the patient underwent an abdominal CT scan that showed a mass located in the head and body of the pancreas, as well as a thrombosis of the splenic vein. A percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas was obtained under CT guidance, which showed no tumoral involvement. Fourty-eight hours after the procedure the patient developed abdominal pain and elevated serum amylase levels. A pancreatic MRI exam showed two pancreatic pseudocysts, one of them located in the left hepatic lobe, the other in the pancreatic tail. Chronic pancreatitis signs also were found. Enteral nutrition via a nasojejunal tube was administered for two weeks. The disappearance of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the pancreatic tail, and a subtotal resolution of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver were observed. To date twenty-seven cases of pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver have been published, most of them managed with percutaneous or surgical drainage. <![CDATA[<B>Hemorragias digestivas bajas severas por angiodisplasia colónica</B>: <B>Manejo y problemática diagnóstica</B>]]> http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1130-01082006000800010&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Pancreatic pseudocyst is a common complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Extrapancreatic locations of pancreatic pseudocyst in the liver, pleura, mediastinum, or pelvis have been described. However, a pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver is an infrequent condition. We present the case of a 46-year-old man with pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. During admission, the patient underwent an abdominal CT scan that showed a mass located in the head and body of the pancreas, as well as a thrombosis of the splenic vein. A percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas was obtained under CT guidance, which showed no tumoral involvement. Fourty-eight hours after the procedure the patient developed abdominal pain and elevated serum amylase levels. A pancreatic MRI exam showed two pancreatic pseudocysts, one of them located in the left hepatic lobe, the other in the pancreatic tail. Chronic pancreatitis signs also were found. Enteral nutrition via a nasojejunal tube was administered for two weeks. The disappearance of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the pancreatic tail, and a subtotal resolution of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver were observed. To date twenty-seven cases of pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver have been published, most of them managed with percutaneous or surgical drainage. <![CDATA[<B>Quiste mesentérico</B>: <B>Experiencia en 4 casos</B>]]> http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1130-01082006000800011&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Pancreatic pseudocyst is a common complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Extrapancreatic locations of pancreatic pseudocyst in the liver, pleura, mediastinum, or pelvis have been described. However, a pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver is an infrequent condition. We present the case of a 46-year-old man with pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. During admission, the patient underwent an abdominal CT scan that showed a mass located in the head and body of the pancreas, as well as a thrombosis of the splenic vein. A percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas was obtained under CT guidance, which showed no tumoral involvement. Fourty-eight hours after the procedure the patient developed abdominal pain and elevated serum amylase levels. A pancreatic MRI exam showed two pancreatic pseudocysts, one of them located in the left hepatic lobe, the other in the pancreatic tail. Chronic pancreatitis signs also were found. Enteral nutrition via a nasojejunal tube was administered for two weeks. The disappearance of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the pancreatic tail, and a subtotal resolution of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver were observed. To date twenty-seven cases of pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver have been published, most of them managed with percutaneous or surgical drainage. <![CDATA[<B>Tratamiento con octreótido en el hidrotórax hepático</B>]]> http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1130-01082006000800012&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Pancreatic pseudocyst is a common complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Extrapancreatic locations of pancreatic pseudocyst in the liver, pleura, mediastinum, or pelvis have been described. However, a pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver is an infrequent condition. We present the case of a 46-year-old man with pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. During admission, the patient underwent an abdominal CT scan that showed a mass located in the head and body of the pancreas, as well as a thrombosis of the splenic vein. A percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas was obtained under CT guidance, which showed no tumoral involvement. Fourty-eight hours after the procedure the patient developed abdominal pain and elevated serum amylase levels. A pancreatic MRI exam showed two pancreatic pseudocysts, one of them located in the left hepatic lobe, the other in the pancreatic tail. Chronic pancreatitis signs also were found. Enteral nutrition via a nasojejunal tube was administered for two weeks. The disappearance of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the pancreatic tail, and a subtotal resolution of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver were observed. To date twenty-seven cases of pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver have been published, most of them managed with percutaneous or surgical drainage. <![CDATA[<B>Metástasis esplénica metacrónica de cáncer de colon</B>: <B>Presentación de un caso infrecuente</B>]]> http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1130-01082006000800013&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Pancreatic pseudocyst is a common complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Extrapancreatic locations of pancreatic pseudocyst in the liver, pleura, mediastinum, or pelvis have been described. However, a pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver is an infrequent condition. We present the case of a 46-year-old man with pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. During admission, the patient underwent an abdominal CT scan that showed a mass located in the head and body of the pancreas, as well as a thrombosis of the splenic vein. A percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas was obtained under CT guidance, which showed no tumoral involvement. Fourty-eight hours after the procedure the patient developed abdominal pain and elevated serum amylase levels. A pancreatic MRI exam showed two pancreatic pseudocysts, one of them located in the left hepatic lobe, the other in the pancreatic tail. Chronic pancreatitis signs also were found. Enteral nutrition via a nasojejunal tube was administered for two weeks. The disappearance of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the pancreatic tail, and a subtotal resolution of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver were observed. To date twenty-seven cases of pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver have been published, most of them managed with percutaneous or surgical drainage. <![CDATA[<B>Expresión de la proteína p53 desde displasia leve hasta adenocarcinoma en un paciente con esófago de Barrett</B>: <B>un estudio con inmunohistoquimia</B>]]> http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1130-01082006000800014&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Pancreatic pseudocyst is a common complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Extrapancreatic locations of pancreatic pseudocyst in the liver, pleura, mediastinum, or pelvis have been described. However, a pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver is an infrequent condition. We present the case of a 46-year-old man with pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. During admission, the patient underwent an abdominal CT scan that showed a mass located in the head and body of the pancreas, as well as a thrombosis of the splenic vein. A percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas was obtained under CT guidance, which showed no tumoral involvement. Fourty-eight hours after the procedure the patient developed abdominal pain and elevated serum amylase levels. A pancreatic MRI exam showed two pancreatic pseudocysts, one of them located in the left hepatic lobe, the other in the pancreatic tail. Chronic pancreatitis signs also were found. Enteral nutrition via a nasojejunal tube was administered for two weeks. The disappearance of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the pancreatic tail, and a subtotal resolution of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver were observed. To date twenty-seven cases of pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver have been published, most of them managed with percutaneous or surgical drainage. <![CDATA[<B>Hepatolitiasis de la placa hiliar simulando colangiocarcinoma perihiliar tipo II</B>]]> http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1130-01082006000800015&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Pancreatic pseudocyst is a common complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Extrapancreatic locations of pancreatic pseudocyst in the liver, pleura, mediastinum, or pelvis have been described. However, a pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver is an infrequent condition. We present the case of a 46-year-old man with pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. During admission, the patient underwent an abdominal CT scan that showed a mass located in the head and body of the pancreas, as well as a thrombosis of the splenic vein. A percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas was obtained under CT guidance, which showed no tumoral involvement. Fourty-eight hours after the procedure the patient developed abdominal pain and elevated serum amylase levels. A pancreatic MRI exam showed two pancreatic pseudocysts, one of them located in the left hepatic lobe, the other in the pancreatic tail. Chronic pancreatitis signs also were found. Enteral nutrition via a nasojejunal tube was administered for two weeks. The disappearance of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the pancreatic tail, and a subtotal resolution of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver were observed. To date twenty-seven cases of pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver have been published, most of them managed with percutaneous or surgical drainage. <link>http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1130-01082006000800016&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es</link> <description/> </item> </channel> </rss> <!--transformed by PHP 09:05:25 06-05-2016-->