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Enfermería Nefrológica

On-line version ISSN 2255-3517Print version ISSN 2254-2884

Abstract

PELAYO ALONSO, Raquel et al. Assessment of pain and adequacy of analgesia in hemodialysis patients. Enferm Nefrol [online]. 2015, vol.18, n.4, pp.253-259. ISSN 2255-3517.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4321/S2254-28842015000400002.

Introduction: Pain is the most common symptom in renal patients due to comorbidity, the dialysis technique and more time on hemodialysis. Objective:To determine the prevalence of intradialytic and chronic pain as well as the adequacy of analgesic therapy in patients on hemodialysis. Methodology: Descriptive study in 33 patients on hemodialysis in which different rating scales were used: Brief Pain Inventory (to determine the chronic pain), Visual Analogue Scale (to assess the intradialytic pain) and Pain Management Index (for checking the conformity of analgesia). Results: Chronic pain occurs in 57.57% of patients and intradialytic pain in 78.8%. In both cases, pain was musculoskeletal, mild (3.14 points and 3.13 points respectively); and related to more time on hemodialysis. Chronic pain interfered with the mood, the usual work and relationship with others. The adequacy of the treatment was successful for chronic pain but not for intradialytic pain. Conclusions: Pain is a frequent symptom in our sample. The intradialytic pain presents a worst pharmacological management than chronic pain.

Keywords : hemodialysis; pain; chronic pain; pain measurement; pain management.

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